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Pondering new bike

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Mr Grumpy View Drop Down
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    Posted: 07 Dec 2019 at 15:23
As I'm a certain age next year where, in theory, I can draw down part of my pension I thought I would treat myself to a new (ish maybe) bike for making it thus far - I've know a few chaps who have not.

I bought my little B750 last year but although I do like it overall, there are a few little niggles such as the endemic front end wobble, lack of power on overtakes especially and I can't quite get used to the handling on corners despite the new pirellis.

I fancy a V7 III but still has only 52BHp but I do like the look of them.  These are the bikes I would consider:

Moto Guzzi V85 TT
BMW 850 GS
Honda VFR 800 Crossrunner

I've just looked at a Honda - very nice, comfortable, 100 bhp but has a black oily thing that makes the back wheel go round. I did n't ride it although I could have done. 

I like the BMW but once again chain drive

I like the sound of the V85 but I have not actually seen one in the flesh.

I don't think I could afford new (may a good deal on the Honda) but maybe I thought there may be a few used V85s available next autumn. Looking at used prices I may be able to afford the Honda and keep the Breva!

What do you think? What are the pros and cons of the choices?
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iansoady View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote iansoady Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Dec 2019 at 15:35
Why so down on chain drive? Modern X ring types are almost maintenance free. The one on my Tiger 955i did 20,000 miles in my hands with a single adjustment and was like new when I sold it.

Mind you perhaps I wasn't using the performance to the full.....
Ian
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Mr Grumpy View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mr Grumpy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Dec 2019 at 15:46
Originally posted by iansoady iansoady wrote:

Why so down on chain drive? Modern X ring types are almost maintenance free. The one on my Tiger 955i did 20,000 miles in my hands with a single adjustment and was like new when I sold it.

Mind you perhaps I wasn't using the performance to the full.....

I think I've gone past using the full performance of a 100 bhp bike - too scary!

I just have memories of chains from years ago - oily hands, having to adjust it in the dark and rain, oil and grease over the back wheel (and all over the road), tight spots and I had one snap on me. Maybe things have moved on. Only MG seem make mid size bikes with shaft drive now.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote sardineone Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Dec 2019 at 16:28

Your B750 front end wobble intrigues me.  I'd think barring a bad front tire you could solve with a steering stem bearing adjustment.  I have to add from my experience with this adjustment to my '86 Lemans.  After 2 tries with no improvement I decided to change the steering head bearings.  Then I found out after tearing up my original bearings on removal, that the INNER races were lightly press fit to the steering stem.  Thus my adjustments per the manual weren't really changing anything.  The trick on my Lemans was to shoot Freon down my steering stem and then tighten the adjuster maybe twice as tight as I normally would, then back-off and then tighten to a normal torque.  I have found that tapered roller bearings tend to seat in once from new and with one effective adjustment will most likely be trouble free from then on.  The rear swing arm pivot bearings also can benefit from an adjustment to around 12in/lbs for high speed stability.  I don't know if this would apply to more current models, but wanted to mention it just in case.

I apologize I don't have direct experience with small block Guzzi's, but my friend's B1100 is very nice and steady handler so I had to speak up in this case.
 
BTW while not up to the peak power of modern 1100's , the 850tt I test rode a couple of months back was a really nice ride.  Very torquey at mid RPM's and great seating position.
George

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BondEquipe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Dec 2019 at 13:08
If you can handle having the chain Triumph Tiger 800 the same vein. A mate bought one and it goes very well. He was certainly chuffed with it. Obviously the 900 is out now so there should be good deals on the older one. 
Stephen
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AdrianW View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote AdrianW Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Dec 2019 at 15:46
I'm a few years past that age & now weight is a major factor in a bike purchase.. Most new bikes are far too lardy and / or tall for those of us who are starting to find some of our bikes seem a bit ungainly. (W650 for example). They're fine on the move but moving them around or more importantly a momentary loss of balance can cause heart-stopping moments.. I looked at the new V7 / V9 ranges but even they are not really very light, not much different fom the Kawasaki..

So, once I  have got the V35II under control the "reserve toy" is coming out in the Spring.. It's small, lightish (175kg) and doesn't have a chain or a shaft.. Sufficient power at around 85bhp (for me anyway) and not remotely sensible...
I've had it for years, time I got some use out of it...

Good luck with your search..

Cheers,
Adrian
Bristol UK
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Glawster View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Glawster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Dec 2019 at 11:35
Originally posted by AdrianW AdrianW wrote:


So, once I  have got the V35II under control the "reserve toy" is coming out in the Spring.. It's small, lightish (175kg) and doesn't have a chain or a shaft.. Sufficient power at around 85bhp (for me anyway) and not remotely sensible...
I've had it for years, time I got some use out of it...


Well I'm intrigued to know what this fabulous 85bhp belt drive lightweight is!

I'll put my two 'pennorth in on Mr Grumpy's bike choice..

I currently have a V85TT and find it a really great bike.  My reference points are my previous "modern" bikes which are Tiger 800, Ducati 1200 Multistrada (only 1 week), BMW R1200LC and Tiger 1050.  I also considered the Honda Crossrunner, but it's very heavy.
Compared to the others the V85 has a great chassis.  Suspension, handling and brakes are fantastic.  It's much lighter and smaller than the GS.  It's similar in dimensions to the Tiger 800 and more comfortable, but definitely heavier.  The engine is perfectly fuelled, with none of the usual jerkiness around town caused by lean mixture which tends to plague modern bikes.  Adding a touring screen and deflector means you can sit in still air.
Downsides - the gearbox is a bit clacky around town and it's underpowered.  I thought I didn't really use more than 80 bhp, and most of the time I don't.  However, when you're in line of traffic and open the taps to overtake, there's a lot of induction noise, but it doesn't translate to much of an increase in speed!  That for me is the only real weakness.  By comparison the engine in the Tiger 800 is bursting with energy.  Oh and the front mudguard is useless.  The easy and cheap solution is to use a low front mudguard from the Aprilia Caponord, but every supplier is curently out of stock.

I think I'll do another summer trip on my V85, so if you're in the market for one next October, let me know!

Cheers, 
Derek

Perfect tool for the Dolomites!
1973 Guzzi V7 Sport
1955 Guzzi Falcone Sport
2019 V85TT

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Dave P. View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dave P. Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Dec 2019 at 13:27
   Quote.   "I think I'll do another summer trip on my V85, so if you're in the market for one next October, let me know!"

Crikey Derek, you're thinking about ditching it already???
TO LIVE OUTSIDE THE LAW YOU MUST BE HONEST.

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AdrianW View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AdrianW Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Dec 2019 at 14:11
Hi Derek,

It's one of these :-






They also do a slightly more touring one called the Ulysses.

Cheers,
Adrian
Bristol UK



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Mr Grumpy View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mr Grumpy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Dec 2019 at 17:23
oooh nice colour. I think I prefer the plain ones rather than the Bertie Basset scheme. 

How do you find the seat for long rides? I saw the video review on Bikesocial and he moaned about it - he did do 900 miles in one day mind.

What sort of speed does it like to cruise at before it feels pushed?


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Mr Grumpy View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mr Grumpy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Dec 2019 at 17:29
A Buell!  A Harley by another name.
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Glawster View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Glawster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Dec 2019 at 20:01
Originally posted by Dave P. Dave P. wrote:

   Quote.  
Crikey Derek, you're thinking about ditching it already???

I'll probably keep it Dave, but I do like a Triumph triple, and they've just increased the Tiger capacity to 900.  Assuming it's the same weight bike with more low end grunt, it must be some bike.  


Buell - I should have guessed Adrian.  I had a go on one of those once and I was astonished how good it was.  Only improvement would be a Ducati engine Wink

Seat comfort on the V85 seems OK.  Max mileage I've done in a day is 435.
I set off cruising at 85 mph.  That's a real sweet spot, but fuel economy plummets to 45 mpg.  At 75 mph you get 60 mpg.
1973 Guzzi V7 Sport
1955 Guzzi Falcone Sport
2019 V85TT

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Richard Hyatt View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Richard Hyatt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Dec 2019 at 20:15
My pal has a tiger but is currently horrified with the service costs
12k is nearly 700 quid with 6 hours labour
24 is nearly 800 quid with about 7.5 hours
Phew

At least the guzzi are about 2 hours or so
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jmee54 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jmee54 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Dec 2019 at 20:26
I had a Buell Cyclone. I loved that bike to bits - it had character in buckets. One day I came home and found my son had taken it for a joy ride and written it off.

Oh, and it was nothing like a Harley. I've had those too.


Edited by jmee54 - 09 Dec 2019 at 20:29
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Glawster View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Glawster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Dec 2019 at 20:36
Originally posted by Richard Hyatt Richard Hyatt wrote:

My pal has a tiger but is currently horrified with the service costs
12k is nearly 700 quid with 6 hours labour
24 is nearly 800 quid with about 7.5 hours
Phew

At least the guzzi are about 2 hours or so

That's a good point Richard.  I called my Triumph dealer to book a minor service as I thought it was still in warranty.  They quoted me £370 basically to change the oil, coolant and brake fluid.  I bought the Dealertool software for £60 and the oils and coolant for £50 and did it myself.  There are some excellent Youtube tutorial videos by Muddysump which make home servicing very easy.  
But of course, nothing like as easy as servicing a Guzzi.
1973 Guzzi V7 Sport
1955 Guzzi Falcone Sport
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