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More engineering from The lad in the shed

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Tarquin View Drop Down
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    Posted: 31 Dec 2018 at 07:55

I had these photos sent over from Gary, " The Lad in the shed".

He's been busy over the holidays making some parts for old bikes to keep them on the road.

Thought you might like to see them seeing as most of us are tinkerers.




Hi Daz
Hope you are all well. Been busy with more stuff to help enthusiasts with their rebuilds.

Thought the Guzzi lads might like them. Got individuality them guys, not like the Klunkenvaggen riders.

First up is an pin for an idler gear in a gear drive cam train. The eagle eyed will see a hole midway along the ground portion which is 0.5mm diameter to give oil flow to the needle roller bearing







Some gears for Parilla cam drives all waiting to be ground. The gears at the front left go onto the tapered crank mainshaft and have a key slot cut in. This was done on a 1930s Rhodes slotting machine taking about 2 minutes each pinion.





Swing arm pin for a 900ss bevel Ducati. The pin was worn so I ground it undersize by 0.3mm and hard chromed it to 0.3mm above it will then be ground to its nominal size again. There are 2 more for narrow case singles and one for a 450 Desmo





One of a batch of 12 crank pins for Lambretta scooters. Over time pressing flywheels apart to replace the big end bearing and rod results in the holes in the flywheels becoming larger, so I make these with a centre portion to the original size of 22.050mm, with the 2 outside ends at 22.100mm. The pins were ground to diameter and due to heat increases of the machine had a taper of 2 microns over their length of 46mm. A micron is 1/1000th of a mm. My teacher once said I must try harder abd nothing seems to have changed





Layshaft and gear for 5 speed Parilla gearbox. First pic shows the pair assembled, second shows both in detail and 3rd is one of layshaft on sine centers waiting to have the 1:10 taper checked. It ended up to be within 0.001mm over its length when finish ground.












Machining inlet valve pockets 0.3mm deeper due to high lift cams being installed in a Suzuki SV 650 race engine. The boring head is a German made Wohlhaupter, fitted into an American Moore jig borer



Edited by Tarquin - 31 Dec 2018 at 08:00
California 111 70th Anniversary Model, California 1100i 75th Anniversary Model, Honda ST1300


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iceni View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote iceni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Dec 2018 at 09:35
Excellent work - a true craftsman. Thanks for the pics - please keep them coming.
Happy New Year to one and all
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Brian UK Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Dec 2018 at 09:59
I would hate to think what all those parts would cost commercially.
Brian.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote iansoady Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Dec 2018 at 11:19
That's lovely stuff. Gears are some of the hardest parts to have made.
Ian
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Scousus maximus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Dec 2018 at 11:59
Brilliant stuff!!!

Wish I could do stuff with my hands and lathes and mills and welding and,,,and...and.

Mind you I'd just spend even more time" au shedde" with even more cold dinners.Tongue

Regards,

John



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote red leader one Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Dec 2018 at 17:23
Astounding.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jmee54 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Dec 2018 at 17:40
Some people are just born clever. Brilliant work!

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Oldrat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Dec 2018 at 18:15
I love these posts Tarquin.  The work from the Lad in the Shed amazes me.  Please pass on our thanks and enthusiasm to him for sharing his results with us.


Hang on to his details, I might need his skills one day Thumbs Up
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Tarquin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Dec 2018 at 20:39
Originally posted by Oldrat Oldrat wrote:

I love these posts Tarquin.  The work from the Lad in the Shed amazes me.  Please pass on our thanks and enthusiasm to him for sharing his results with us.


Hang on to his details, I might need his skills one day Thumbs Up



Thanks Oldrat, will do.

Gary is also a retired rodent just like me
California 111 70th Anniversary Model, California 1100i 75th Anniversary Model, Honda ST1300


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mike H Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Jan 2019 at 15:39
Are the gear parts hardened? If so, how?

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tarquin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Jan 2019 at 16:04
Originally posted by Mike H Mike H wrote:

Are the gear parts hardened? If so, how?





No idea Mike, but you can ask him as he's a member on here under " Lad in the Shed"
California 111 70th Anniversary Model, California 1100i 75th Anniversary Model, Honda ST1300


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jerry atric Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Jan 2019 at 19:01
Just marvellous. Schools don't even teach metalwork any more so how will we replace heroes like this?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lad in the shed Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Jan 2019 at 23:48
Good evening gents. Pleased you like some of the parts I have been busy with over the last few months and many thanks to Tarquin for posting them. They are made from a steel with a high carbon and nickel content called EN36 which is high quality in its supplied state, but can be "case hardened" to provide a hard skin, yet retain a soft core. The advantages are that the part resists wear, but is still strong because it is not too brittle as through hardening would give. Ideally suited to shafts, crank pins and gears where high wear resistance is required. The disadvantages are that the parts "move" after machining, where bores shrink and outside diameters grow (maybe 0.02mm, but enough so that a finish machined surface will grow or shrink). Also, shafts are inclined to bend a little, maybe 0.1mm over 150mm (think of a banana). To get round this, an allowance of around 0.4mm is left on critical diameters (bore and outer diameters). After hardening, the job is then finish ground to size. Modern methods allow high speed CNC machines to finish turn the parts with ceramic turning tips, but I don't have one of these! The hardening process involves quite scientific methods of heating to a specific temperature, soaking it at that for a period of time, then quenching in oil to achieve the required hardness. Another steel designated as EN24T is great to machine and can be finished to size, then tuftrided to give a shallow surface hardness of around 0.02mm. Advantages of this steel is it doesn't move after hardening, but isn't as strong as case hardened EN36. Parts your Guzzis will have from case hardened steel (EN36 or equivalent) will be the gearbox shafts and pinions, the rear crown wheel and pinion and the camshafts. Hope you find this informative.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Oldrat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Jan 2019 at 08:51
Very, thanks for taking the trouble. As always I’m amazed at the tolerances you work with.

Keep up the excellent work Lad, you’ll always have groupies in places like this.

1976 "Zagato" Gootsi cafe racer
1980 LM 2, Coburn and Hughes.
2017 BMW R1200 GSA
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Brian UK Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Jan 2019 at 09:38
When working to those tolerances, temperature can be an issue. A guy I met a few years back had a similar setup, his shed was kept warmish, but his store was not, so he had two micrometers, one in the warm and the other in the colder store.
Brian.

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