guzziriders.org - moto guzzi forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Technical > Spine Frame
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - E10 FUEL
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

E10 FUEL

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
Guztave View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: 30 Nov 2014
Location: Exeter
Status: Offline
Points: 423
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guztave Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: E10 FUEL
    Posted: 04 Dec 2020 at 16:17
Will E10 fuel have an adverse on our Guzzi's?

Thanks
Back to Top
Hippo-Drones View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 07 Nov 2020
Location: Sussex
Status: Offline
Points: 321
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hippo-Drones Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Dec 2020 at 16:55
It can mess with the fuel filter
This is me: www.youtube.com/c/HippoDrones
Back to Top
Ken-Guzzibear View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group
Avatar

Joined: 13 May 2014
Location: Sileby Leics
Status: Offline
Points: 8227
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Ken-Guzzibear Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Dec 2020 at 17:25
Also on older bikes eat fuel lines causing leaks it can cause more rust in metal fuel tanks too and mess with other fuel components
The Older i Get, The Better I Was
Back to Top
Garry.L View Drop Down
Falcone
Falcone
Avatar

Joined: 30 Aug 2020
Location: Cheshire
Status: Offline
Points: 36
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Garry.L Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Dec 2020 at 18:56
Ethanol is hydroscopic so absorbs water, which isn't so bad for daily riders but older bikes left for long periods can suffer with rusty fuel tanks and drying of seals, rubber fuel lines in particular can go very hard, brittle and shrink. 

I've restored lots of classics and where possible use Super unleaded which contains less ethanol. I also use a fuel stabiliser over winter as modern fuels can start to lose their octane rating in as little as 3 months. 


Back to Top
Rushjob View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 18 Sep 2020
Location: Auvergne
Status: Offline
Points: 138
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rushjob Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Dec 2020 at 21:24
Originally posted by Garry.L Garry.L wrote:

Ethanol is hydroscopic so absorbs water, which isn't so bad for daily riders but older bikes left for long periods can suffer with rusty fuel tanks and drying of seals, rubber fuel lines in particular can go very hard, brittle and shrink. 

I've restored lots of classics and where possible use Super unleaded which contains less ethanol. I also use a fuel stabiliser over winter as modern fuels can start to lose their octane rating in as little as 3 months. 



I think you may mean hygroscopic, as in something which attracts and absorbs water molecules, rather than hydroscopic which is in connection with devices used when viewing items under water.....

Just my 2p.....
Insert witty signature below............
Back to Top
Brian UK View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group
Avatar

Joined: 13 May 2014
Location: Surrey
Status: Offline
Points: 15612
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Brian UK Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Dec 2020 at 21:40
Never heard of any problems with fuel filters.

How it might affect things depends on the model concerned.
It will affect many fuel hoses, and plastic tanks in various ways.

Yes Ethanol is hygroscopic but a lot of problems are blamed on ethanol without full investigation. Brake fluid is very hygroscopic, but that doesn't rust or rot metals, and that is often left for many, many years.
Many pictures I've seen of carb castings in a poor state, blamed on ethanol, but are clearly due to salt from our roads in winter.
Brian.

Better 5 minutes late in this world than years early in the next.
Back to Top
Garry.L View Drop Down
Falcone
Falcone
Avatar

Joined: 30 Aug 2020
Location: Cheshire
Status: Offline
Points: 36
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Garry.L Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Dec 2020 at 08:50
Originally posted by Brian UK Brian UK wrote:

 Brake fluid is very hygroscopic, but that doesn't rust or rot metals, and that is often left for many, many years.
Many pictures I've seen of carb castings in a poor state, blamed on ethanol, but are clearly due to salt from our roads in winter.

Unlike the fuel system though, the braking system is sealed and it's contents aren't constantly changing. 

Agreed, Ethanol is unlikely to cause external corrosion to carbs, however I've stripped many carbs from classic bikes for ultrasonic cleaning only to be greeted by a float bowl full of white corrosion residue and fuel tap O-Rings cracked and perished even on bikes unused for only a few years... 


Edited by Garry.L - 05 Dec 2020 at 08:53
Back to Top
Brian UK View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group
Avatar

Joined: 13 May 2014
Location: Surrey
Status: Offline
Points: 15612
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Brian UK Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Dec 2020 at 10:58
Straighforward water in the fuel, which is not unheard of, will also cause problems particularly with zinc castings.
With regard to rust, the suggestion above was that it was more of a problem where the fuel is not constantly changing.
There is no doubt that ethanol does cause problems with plastics and rubber, but the jury is still out when it comes to metals.
Petrol tanks on old bikes, left untouched, used to rust on the inside long before Ethanol was heard of.
Brian.

Better 5 minutes late in this world than years early in the next.
Back to Top
Stevex View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 24 Nov 2020
Location: North Yorkshire
Status: Offline
Points: 193
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Stevex Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Dec 2020 at 11:14
Esso Super apparently has no ethanol apart from petrol stations in Teesside, Cornwall, Devon, scotchland and the NW.
They say there is no requirement to put ethanol in Super unleaded, but that may be changing with the introduction of e10. The main problem is no other petrol producer will say how much, if any, of their fuels contain this garbage.
There is an fairly easy way to test whether there is ethanol in fuel though, so you could test your local supply. 
I have a nylon fuel tank on my Aprilia, and it has expanded slightly after absorbing some water from ethanol, but I empty all my bikes fuel tanks over winter.
Steve
Back to Top
Ken-Guzzibear View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group
Avatar

Joined: 13 May 2014
Location: Sileby Leics
Status: Offline
Points: 8227
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ken-Guzzibear Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Dec 2020 at 15:14
Never had to change fuel lines for 10 yrs once ethanol introduced even with Ethanol "proof" fuel lines they go soft and found flakes in fuel filters it was thin lining from fuel lines. I did get told by an engineer to pop redex or similar into fuel it seems to help stop the ethanol. Put it this way Annies Virago sat for 12-18 months popped a battery on it , fired up right off no coughing/spluttering or any sign of fuel being "bad" or even slightly ill. Tend to buy Redex from Wilko way cheaper than anywhere else. Some yrs ago tried Millers Octane booster, seemed to help, but Redex more readily available. 

The low compression V1000 and Cali EV don't mind the unleaded, Yrs ago when you used to get 5* fuel my Norton and a Rover 2000TC certainly ran rougher on only 4* when they made 5* difficult to get I had the both vehicles de tuned to run easier Rover went into main dealer the Norton solution more old school ...a bigger head gasket ...I kid you not, lowered compression lol
The Older i Get, The Better I Was
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 12.03
Copyright ©2001-2019 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.094 seconds.