guzziriders.org - moto guzzi forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Technical > Small Blocks
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Caliper bolt torque for V50 (F05)
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Caliper bolt torque for V50 (F05)

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  123>
Author
Message
iansoady View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 23 Jul 2017
Location: Birmingham
Status: Offline
Points: 790
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote iansoady Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Caliper bolt torque for V50 (F05)
    Posted: 18 Dec 2017 at 15:15
I've decided to rebuild the calipers with new seals as there was a suspicion of a leak on one. Anyone have the torque figure for the clamp bolts that hold the 2 halves of the caliper together? They were pretty tight.....
Ian
1982 V50
1952 Norton ES2
Back to Top
GC888 View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 21 Dec 2015
Location: Manchester UK
Status: Offline
Points: 158
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GC888 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Dec 2017 at 17:02
manual says 2.5 to 2.9 Kgm for calliper bodies 

Which works out about 18ft lb 
and what you expect for an M8 bolt into alloy without a helicoil. 

Was it tight because of corrosion or Locktight ? 

Caviate is that I always check as the measurements in the book are sometimes out !
Back to Top
Brian UK View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group
Avatar

Joined: 13 May 2014
Location: Surrey
Status: Offline
Points: 8989
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Brian UK Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Dec 2017 at 17:13
Never used a torque wrench for that, fairly tight with the appropriate allen key.
Brian.

Better 5 minutes late in this world than years early in the next.
Back to Top
V7Chris View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: 13 May 2017
Location: Shropshire
Status: Offline
Points: 987
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote V7Chris Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Dec 2017 at 17:51
I think you use 'the force' Brian to sense the appropriate torque to apply - finger tight, medium tight or FT (you can guess). I do take the common sense approach most of the time, but in the offshore oil and gas industry and similar safety critical industries (nuclear) you simply won't get away with that, they even have data logging air/hydraulic torque wrenches now in use that record the actual progressive torque applied when tightening flange bolts. I take the view that if it is safety related and there is a torque setting, I use it. That way, no one can ever say in the coroners court 'this accident happened because the flegelspegel bolt was over/under tightened...etc' trouble is, not everyone will have your experience to know what 'tight enough' with an appropriate alen key is.

Edited by V7Chris - 18 Dec 2017 at 17:55
Back to Top
David Owen View Drop Down
Falcone
Falcone
Avatar

Joined: 08 Oct 2017
Location: The Algarve
Status: Offline
Points: 38
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote David Owen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Dec 2017 at 19:14
You checked on thisoldtractor.com, right? I found the whole dang workshop manual for mine there. And it's free! Free, I tells ya!
Back to Top
Simmoto View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: 29 Jul 2017
Location: UK
Status: Offline
Points: 193
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Simmoto Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Dec 2017 at 20:19
I'm with Brian on this one. Torque values have....value IF you trust the published torque figures. My view of the Guzzi values in handbooks is that some are way high and you stand a very real chance of stripping threads if you blindly follow them. 

Back to Top
Brian UK View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group
Avatar

Joined: 13 May 2014
Location: Surrey
Status: Offline
Points: 8989
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Brian UK Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Dec 2017 at 22:41
There are four tightness settings,
Finger tight
Medium tight
Very tight and
Til you fart tight.
 
The latter is usually too much.
 
But if you can find the torque settings and have a known accurate torque wrench, use it.
Brian.

Better 5 minutes late in this world than years early in the next.
Back to Top
iansoady View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 23 Jul 2017
Location: Birmingham
Status: Offline
Points: 790
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote iansoady Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Dec 2017 at 10:43
The existing bolts actually had copaslip on them. I must say I loathe that stuff - it gets everywhere and looks horrible. If I really need an anti-seize compound I use something like this:



but usually I find a thin smear of ordinary HMP grease does the trick.

I'm normally in Brian's camp (of course he omitted the final one - tighten till it strips then half a turn back - but have not worked on this type of caliper before so needed some guidance. The ones that came out were definitely more than 18 ft-lb. I understand new ones come with the caliper rebuild kits.
Ian
1982 V50
1952 Norton ES2
Back to Top
Dennis menace View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 04 Jul 2016
Location: Farnsfield
Status: Offline
Points: 100
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dennis menace Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Dec 2017 at 11:27
The bolts on mine were very tight but it was obviously corrosion due to the mismatch of metals. They 'gave' all of a sudden with a loud snapping sound and a shower of powder. I replaced my bolts with stainless and used a little copperslip. I tightened them by 'feel' and not too tight and they held perfectly. The mating surfaces are good and substantial so no need to 'grunt up' the bolts.
Back to Top
cyclobutch View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 08 Sep 2015
Location: Essex Branch
Status: Offline
Points: 752
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cyclobutch Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Dec 2017 at 11:56
Yeah, I tend to just go with touchy feely myself. And copperslip. 
Butch
V50 II - 'The Black Pearl'
T3 - 'Blue'
Eldo Loop - 'Jug'
Back to Top
GC888 View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 21 Dec 2015
Location: Manchester UK
Status: Offline
Points: 158
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GC888 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Dec 2017 at 12:55
Cant think of a reason not to use a torque gauge and setting if you have the setting 
Cant think of a reason not to use a torque gauge and setting if you don't have as they are easy enough to find. 

There are tables correlating what bolt in what material and if that fails or you want to check, lots of manuals out there that will tell you what a similar bolt in a similar materials torque setting is. 

On calliper clams while the ultimate torque is important; getting the bolts to apply even pressure is of equal or more importance. 

As the bolts were corroded into the clams I may just run a tap through to clean the threads off,
Locktite will work as a good lubricant before it sets (rather than copperslip)so an equal torque setting should be good enough. to get equal pressure (the actual seal is via a captive o ring).

If you really wanted to be 100% certain then stage tighten, finishing of with a angle gauge to match would work best.

On the other hand brakes are not important feature so a good guess will be fine, whats the worst that can happen.... If they fail you can use your gears or drag you feet to slow :-) 
 
Back to Top
iansoady View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 23 Jul 2017
Location: Birmingham
Status: Offline
Points: 790
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote iansoady Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Dec 2017 at 14:20
Originally posted by GC888 GC888 wrote:

On the other hand brakes are not important feature so a good guess will be fine, whats the worst that can happen.... If they fail you can use your gears or drag you feet to slow :-) 
 


......

One advantage of the linked brake system is that I will have adequate stopping power even if one system fails completely......
Ian
1982 V50
1952 Norton ES2
Back to Top
Mike H View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 21 May 2014
Location: East Anglia
Status: Offline
Points: 5719
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mike H Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Dec 2017 at 14:41
Originally posted by iansoady iansoady wrote:

The existing bolts actually had copaslip on them.
 I must say I loathe that stuff - it gets everywhere and looks horrible.

Never had that problem. Big smile


-
"Chicken nuggets don't dance on a Tuesday."
Back to Top
iansoady View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 23 Jul 2017
Location: Birmingham
Status: Offline
Points: 790
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote iansoady Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Dec 2017 at 14:45
It can't have been you that slathered it on my V50 then.
Ian
1982 V50
1952 Norton ES2
Back to Top
Mike H View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 21 May 2014
Location: East Anglia
Status: Offline
Points: 5719
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mike H Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Dec 2017 at 14:45
Oo no I don't slather. Big smile


-

"Chicken nuggets don't dance on a Tuesday."
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  123>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 12.00
Copyright ©2001-2018 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.047 seconds.