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Vegas Pete View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vegas Pete Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Sep 2018 at 17:07
Over here (meaning the USA), auto gas octane rating is expressed as the average of "Motor method" octane (determined by burning a sample in a veriable compression test engine and noting the knock point) and "Research method" octane (which is what the petro-chemists say it should be), or M+R divided by 2.  Our most common octane grades are "87", "89", and "91".  In areas that are above 5000' elevation, "87" is usually replaced by "85".  Gasoline is shipped as two grades which are blended to make the octane rating desired.

As always, it seems politics tend to creep into everything.  The first state to hold presidential elections in the U.S. is Iowa.  Iowa grows lots of corn.  Because it's very important to win the first couple of primaries, politicians do everything they can to make sure Iowa is happy, like mandating ethyl alcohol in gasoline.  I've heard that these days more than half of Iowa's corn crop ends up as fuel additives, so much so that Mexico is complaining about the price of tortillas which are made from corn.  The politicians are quick to point out the "environmental advantages" of ethynol while overlooking the natural gas used to distill it, the diesel used to haul it, and the fact it doesn't burn all that well in lower compression engines.

Before ethynol, the big thing was MTBE (methyl tri-butyl either).  I don't know for sure, but I strongly suspect that oil companies used to have to pay to get rid of the stuff until somebody discovered that a). it contained lots of oxygen, and b). it had a low BTU content so mixing it with gasoline meant more fuel had to be burned in order to make up the difference.  From the mid 1970s to about 1990 it was added in ever increasing amounts to gasoline here in the U.S. until it was noticed that the rate of asthma followed the amount of MTBE in fuel, so it was abandoned in favor of ethynol, which was also of more value if you were running for president.  

Good Lord- I promised not to do it again, and here I am, not only ranting but spouting conspiracy theories!

So, what kinds of crap do they mix with petrol on your side of the pond?

Vegas Pete. 
2010 V7 Classic, 2005 Ural Gearup, 1980 Yamaha DT175, 1973 Rokon RT-140, 1969 Rokon MkIII
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jefrs View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jefrs Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Sep 2018 at 20:50
Originally posted by Brian UK Brian UK wrote:

I would have thought most fuel delivery runs in a tanker would last less than 24 hours, does the stuff deteriorate that quickly?


Apparently it can take a week or more from refinery to depot to forecourt. Depends how far and where you are in the pecking order.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BobV7 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Sep 2018 at 20:54
Enthanol...but only just enough melt vital fuel seals or to make plastic fuel tanks soft and go the wrong shape.Angry
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jerry atric Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Sep 2018 at 21:59
Don't the Mexicans grow their own corn? Lazy buggers I like your theories, Pete. Let's have another one
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote rapheal Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Sep 2018 at 16:18
I buy my fuel from a Shell Station
because my friend works there 
and she is not hard to look at !

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BobV7 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Sep 2018 at 16:29
And that's a good a reason as any.Thumbs Up
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Adam View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Adam Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Sep 2018 at 16:56
Originally posted by rapheal rapheal wrote:

I buy my fuel from a Shell Station
because my friend works there 
and she is not hard to look at !


And you only put 1 litre in each visit😀
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ken-Guzzibear Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Sep 2018 at 20:50
There was an article in a trade magazine some time ago Tesco is supplied by Esso and Sainsburys by BP .....However a mate who worked in a large refinery actually pointed out ALL the tankers took fuel from the same place BUT different manufacturers then added their own additives from their own tanks that was the difference it is the stuff they add to the fuel ......bit like all whiskey when distilled is a white spirit it is the still and maturing process that makes the difference well mainly.

The shell staition locally had something in t's storage tanks that showed in filters as like very tiny red beads ......never seen it from anywhere else but local dealer had 5 bikes in with fuel starvation all down to the same sludge ALL of the owners exclusively used Shell ...from that same forecourt .... no other station was affected ... weird or summat in the storage tanks maybe

Edited by Ken-Guzzibear - 17 Sep 2018 at 20:53
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote nab301 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Sep 2018 at 21:05
I may stand to be corrected but  locally  98 octane isn't readily available in Southern Ireland . I used to travel North fairly regularly where it is available  and  my  Bmw twin would cover maybe 20 more miles between fill ups (3gallons ish) . I tend to be pedantic about monitoring petrol consumption even if I'm not paying for the fuel myself mainly as a means of keeping a record of how a vehicle is running.   I've had carbureted bikes that wouldn't cold  idle (with choke) on one brand of fuel,  and wildly varying petrol consumption so much so that I tend to stick to a couple of well known local brands wherever I am in the country, and as mentioned earlier in the thread only purchase from busy stations with hopefully high turnover.   What i have noticed is that 2 strokes aside, (although they  probably deserve another thread) all my modes of transport seem to have better fuel consumption than the likes of  Mk 1 Fiestas  and Mk2 Escorts  (16 to 18 mpg Shocked)  that I drove as works transport back in the day . Maybe that's something to do with the advancing years of the Rider / driver... as much as improvements in vehicle technology.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jerry atric Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Sep 2018 at 21:47
Vehicles that you don't own never do as much mpg! but 18mpg must have been thrashing the bottom off them!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Brian UK Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Sep 2018 at 22:00
Early Fords were very thirsty, had a mk 2 Cortina, 22 mpg max. But an SU carb conversion usually upped that to over 30.
Brian.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vegas Pete Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Sep 2018 at 02:08
Here in the U.S., fuel is supplied through “distributors”, which have the exclusive franchise to supply a certain area.  All of the major and minor brands have stations throughout the area, but 100% of their fuel originates from the single distributor.

About 30 years ago I was living in an area in the state of Arizona, where all of the fuel came from Texaco.  The local governments collected their road maintenance taxes directly from Texaco, and one year Texaco accidentally paid the year’s taxes twice. 
 No one noticed the mistake (it was a fairly small area), and the local government, realizing they suddenly had more money than expected, went into a feeding frenzy, spending it lavishly on everything they wanted.
The mistake was found, and Texaco,having already paid the taxes, didn’t have to pay the next year’s.
By that time, the windfall had all been spent, and by the end of the next year the roads had potholes that would rival some of the ones I’ve seen in rural RussiaWacko.

Vegas Pete.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Brian UK Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Sep 2018 at 09:26
I suspect here in the UK we have potholes to rival those in rural Russia.
Brian.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Adam Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Sep 2018 at 14:30
One in my street is deeper than rural Russia
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Brian UK Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Sep 2018 at 14:56
You should see the M25 locally. Concrete block roadway. Joints have been ground out and refilled, but the filler has now come out in many parts, leaving a 4 inch wide gully about 1.5 inches deep, some across the carriageway, some along it, but going from side to side of each lane.
Brian.

Better 5 minutes late in this world than years early in the next.
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